What cattle and sheep farmers are doing

Jane Sale from Yougawalla Station in Western Australia explains why they, and so many others, implement and practise Low Stress Stockhandling on their cattle station.

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    Kerwee Feedlot

    The feedlot has been owned and operated by the Hart family for over 45 years.

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    Samarai

    Appropriate stocking intensity, together with longer rest periods, helped us achieve better pasture health, ground cover & good cattle performance.

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    Yagaburne Beef

    Every effort is made to ensure cattle are raised as nature intended.

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    Kerwee Feedlot

    The feedlot has been owned and operated by the Hart family for over 45 years.

  • Thumb Page Image - default

    Samarai

    Appropriate stocking intensity, together with longer rest periods, helped us achieve better pasture health, ground cover & good cattle performance.

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    Yagaburne Beef

    Every effort is made to ensure cattle are raised as nature intended.

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    Morse Family

    We're passionate about ag & want to ensure our children have the opportunity for a sustainable future on the land.

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    Bellevue Feedlot

    At all times the welfare of the cattle in Bellevue Feedlot is the number one priority for us.

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    Highfield Farm & Woodland

    We are working to improve our grazing land through developing & maintaining wildlife corridors.

What you can do

Chef Darren Robertson explains how as a Bettertarian he chooses to eat with understanding, and how you can too.

  • Try to avoid overbuying food. Remember refrigerated foods and fresh fruit and vegetables have a limited shelf life.

  • By planning a weekly menu, including supplies for morning teas and lunch boxes you can buy what you need and reduce food waste.

  • You can make your own stock by using leftover beef and lamb, bones and vegetables.

  • Try to avoid overbuying food. Remember refrigerated foods and fresh fruit and vegetables have a limited shelf life.

  • By planning a weekly menu, including supplies for morning teas and lunch boxes you can buy what you need and reduce food waste.

  • You can make your own stock by using leftover beef and lamb, bones and vegetables.

  • Fresh herbs are an easy way to make your meals more interesting and add more flavour.

  • A lot of packaging is unnecessary and effort should be taken to avoid buying overly packaged foods.

  • Get a compost bin or worm farm for your fresh food kitchen waste and use this to fertilise your garden.